Work On Your Business, Not In Your Business

Work On Your Business, Not In Your Business. What does this mean anyway? Let me explain.

Working in your business includes providing services, selling products, scheduling appointments, managing employees, general upkeep, and so on. It encompasses all the things that have to be done every day to keep your business running.

Working on your business includes planning how you want to expand your services and products, how you’re going to target a new niche, and how many new marketing strategies you’re going to try. These things don’t just keep your business running, they help it grow.

Get the difference?

Working in your business is fine. Everyone does it. But you also need to work on your business. You need to plan to be successful.

As your business grows, you should work less and less in your business. You can hire other people to work in your business. But if you don’t work on your business, no one else will!

This is a very powerful strategy.

It’s how Walt Disney built the enormous Disney empire, which started from just a few cartoons and grew to include Disney World, Disneyland, all the Disney characters, movie studios, and a huge media business. He didn’t just draw Mickey Mouse all day; he worked on expanding his business into one of the most successful companies in America. One of the reasons it’s still so successful is that the people at the top work on the business, not in it.

This same strategy will work for you too. Work less and less in, and more and more on your business.  You’ll see great results!

Kenya turns to online tourism marketing

Kenya has approached top global experts in online tourism in a new move to help dispense negative sentiments about the tourism industry by building website traffic with positive information to grow bookings.

The Kenya Tourist Board (KTB) has invited Trip Advisor, Expedia and Facebook officials for a two-day regional conference on e-tourism to guide local sector players on leveraging technology to boost online tourism sales.

This is expected to tone down increased reports on the country’s insecurity and lower the number of travel advisories issued by key traditional source markets. Constant terror attacks have seen local tourism revenues drop for the last three consecutive years, leaving the country KSh 6 billion short of its targeted Sh100 billion annual earnings.

The tourism ministry last month reported a 15.8 per cent drop in arrivals from 1.8 million in 2012 to 1.5 million between January to December last year, pushing down revenues by 2.31 per cent to Sh93.9 billion compared to Sh97.9 billion in 2011.

But a strong focus will now be pegged on benefits of using social networking sites, like Twitter, Facebook and YouTube to turn around the figures by promoting Kenya as a luxury destination.

Don’t get left behind, grow your website visitor traffic today. Get in touch with Mark and Ryse and learn how.

Article by Conrad Onyango

Why successful people are rarely accessible

Chris Lema recently wrote a post about being less accessible in order to be more successful in your work.

In a nutshell, he cited that successful people have boundaries:

  • They don’t work for free.
  • They don’t work for just anyone.
  • They’re picky.
  • They’re selective.
  • They don’t let themselves be interrupted.
  • They create barriers to entry.
  • They make you work to meet up.
  • And when they’re with you, they’re focused.
  • Because they don’t let themselves be interrupted.

In short, successful people rarely waste their time. This piece was intriguing because I find there are so many people out there who are always free and available. Admittedly, there are times when I have been guilty of doing the exact opposite of some of these principles.

One of the principles – successful people do not do stuff for the sake of friendship; got me thinking how many times I have done business with clients and given them a bargain because they were “friends.”

And so I made a resolve to adopt a number of the above characteristics of successful people. So next time you find me taking time to respond to your Google or Facebook chat, just know it’s not personal it’s success!

Are you willing to adopt those characteristics? Let me know…